/tag/docker

  • Microservice Deployments

    Kubernetes is a container orchestrator for both short-running (such as workflow/pipeline stages) and long-running (such as web and database servers) jobs. Containerized applications running in the UVARC Kubernetes cluster are visible to UVA Research networks (and therefore from Rivanna, Skyline, etc.). Web applications can be made visible to the UVA campus or the public Internet. Kubernetes Research Computing runs microservices in a Kubernetes cluster that automates the deployment and management of many containers easy and scalable. This cluster will have over 24 instances, >2000 cores and >2TB of memory allocated to running containerized services. It will also have over 300TB of cluster storage and can attach to both project and standard storage.
  • Container Service Request

    – Name * E-mail * User ID * Classification * - Select -FacultyStaffPostdoctoral AssociateOther Affiliation * - Select - College of Arts & Sciences School of Data Science School of Engineering and Applied Sciences School of Medicine Darden School of Business UVA Health System Other Project Summary Please describe your project and the container images you want to run. Tier of Service *     6 - 15 containers ($10/month total)   15 containers ($48/month total) Billing Tiers are selected and paid for by the PI.
  • Microservices

    Microservice architecture is an approach to designing and running applications. Such applications are typically run within containers, made popular in the last few years by Docker. Containers are portable, efficient, and disposable, and contain code and any dependencies in a single package. Containerized microservices typically run a single process, rather than an entire stack within the same computing environment. This allows portions of your application to be easily replaced or scaled as needed. Transition to Kubernetes - Research Computing is transitioning away from DCOS for microservice orchestration in favor of Kubernetes, the open-source orchestrator originating from Google. New deployments will be launched directly in Kuberenetes and existing DCOS deployments will be migrated over the Summer and Fall of 2022.
  • BART Web

    BART (Binding Analysis for Regulation of Transcription) Web Working with researchers in the Zang Lab in the Center for Public Health Genomics (CPHG), RC helped launch BARTweb, an interactive web-based tool for users to analyze their Genelist or ChIP-seq datasets. BARTweb is a containerized Flask front-end (written in Python) that ingests files and submits them to a more robust Python-based genomics pipeline running on Rivanna, UVA’s high performance computing cluster (HPC). This architecture – of a public web application that uses a supercomputer to process data – is a new model for UVA, and one that eases the learning curve for researchers who may not have access to an HPC system or the expertise to run a BART pipeline in the command-line.
  • Software Containers

    Overview Containers bundle an application, the libraries and other executables it may need, and even the data used with the application into portable, self-contained files called images. Containers simplify installation and management of software with complex dependencies and can also be used to package workflows. Singularity is a container application targeted to multi-user, high-performance computing systems. It interoperates well with Slurm and with the Lmod modules system. Singularity can be used to create and run its own containers, or it can import Docker containers. Creating Singularity Containers To create your own image from scratch, you must have root privileges on some computer running Linux (any version).
  • LOLAweb

    The past few years have seen an explosion of interest in understanding the role of regulatory DNA. This interest has driven large-scale production of functional genomics data resources and analytical methods. One popular analysis is to test for enrichment of overlaps between a query set of genomic regions and a database of region sets. In this way, annotations from external data sources can be easily connected to new genomic data. SOM Research Computing is working with faculty in the UVA Center for Public Health Genomics to implement LOLAweb, an online tool for performing genomic locus overlap annotations and analyses. This project, written in the statistical programming language R, allows users to specify region set data in BED format for automated enrichment analysis.
  • Refgenie: A Reference Genome Resource Manager

    Reference genome assemblies are essential for high-throughput sequencing analysis projects. Typically, genome assemblies are stored on disk alongside related resources; e.g., many sequence aligners require the assembly to be indexed. The resulting indexes are broadly applicable for downstream analysis, so it makes sense to share them. However, there is no simple tool to do this. Refgenie is a reference genome assembly asset manager. Refgenie makes it easier to organize, retrieve, and share genome analysis resources. In addition to genome indexes, refgenie can manage any files related to reference genomes, including sequences and annotation files. Refgenie includes a command line interface and a server application that provides a RESTful API, so it is useful for both tool development and analysis.